Occupational Therapy VS Physical Therapy

There is often confusion between OT and PT,This will be a quick run down of the differences.

Definitions: 

OT: To maintain, recover, or develop skills of people with physical, mental, or cognitive disabilities. Focusing on improving a persons daily abilities and improving life skills.

PT: The treatment of a disease, injury, or deformity by physical methods such as massage, heat treatment, and exercise. Evaluating and diagnosing movement dysfunctions.

Daily Roles:

OT: An OT works with people of all ages, helping with anything from handwriting with an elderly person to calm down techniques with a child. An OT’s patients vary from an elderly person who experienced a stroke, to a young child with autism.

PT: A PT works with people of all ages. Focusing on strengthening a certain muscle that could have been damaged due to injury or a birth deformity. A PT techniques are different from an OT, A PT works with exercise and massage to correct an injury.

Perceptions:

OT: Typically, if you talk to someone about OT they have no clue what you’re talking about. It is not a very well known job. It is also hard to explain to someone who has never heard of it.

PT: Almost everyone knows what a PT is, because chances are that some point in everyone’s life, you are going to need PT. It is a very well known job and understood easily.

Salary Differences: 

OT: median $78,810

PT: median $82,390

a difference of just over $3,500  

Education: 

OT: Bachelors in practically anything, but must include certain courses. Masters in OT.

PT: Bachelors and masters. Some PT’s hold a doctorate.

Licensing: 

OT: National Occupational Certification Examination

PT: National, Physical Therapist Examination

 

The First Post

I first learned about occupational therapy as a young teenager, needing some help managing stress and other issues. My first appointment was the highlight of my week; there were crash pads, hammocks, fidgets, etc. I didn’t think playing games and using toys would help me… But it did.

I learned techniques, I had fun, and I managed a lot better in my day to day life. I only recently thought of occupational therapy as a career choice for myself. I originally was thinking of becoming a registered psychologist, only to find out it takes at least 13 years of schooling. I don’t want to be in my 30s just starting a career. So I searched the web looking for jobs that help kids. I came across occupational therapy, and remembered that I was personally helped by it.

Although I have a full on plan for school and a career, I am still in high school. It’s probably the coolest school in all of Canada. We focus on inquiries. I’m experimenting with sensory play to build this website to develop my research. This being my official first post, I’m still getting the hang of this. Bare with me, I’ll get better as the days pass.